Acupuncture for Stress Relief

Articles

Acupuncture Gets Respect

 

Some people say the ancient therapy of acupuncture really works to relieve pain – now research backs them up

 

Arthritis Today

 

It’s been about 2,000 years in the making, but acupuncture is becoming more mainstream. Research shows that the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis (OA), and fibromyalgia might be treated with acupuncture. But how?

 

The ancient – and current – theory of acupuncture goes like this: An essential life energy called qi (pronounced “chee”) flows through the body along 20 invisible channels called meridians. When the flow of this energy is blocked or out of balance, illness or pain occurs. More than 2,000 acupuncture points connect to the meridians. Stimulating those points with needles may correct the flow and alleviate pain.

 

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Study: Acupuncture May Boost Pregnancy

 

USA Today

 

It’s been It sounds far-fetched — sticking needles in women to help them become pregnant — but a scientific review suggests that acupuncture might improve the odds of conceiving if done right before or after embryos are placed in the womb.

 

The surprising finding is far from proven, and there are only theories for how and why acupuncture might work. However, some fertility specialists say they are hopeful that this relatively inexpensive and simple treatment might ultimately prove to be a useful add-on to traditional methods.

 

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Acupuncture: Reversing the Stressful Effects of Running

 

Running Times, July 10, 2010

 

IGrowing up in North America, like many others, I originally thought of acupuncture as some exotic placebo, questionably effective and a little frightening. My first direct exposure came following a hard marathon in Tochigi, Japan, in November 2006. Looking for a post-race massage, I found that organizers were instead offering complimentary post-race acupuncture treatments.

 

I decided to give it a go and was pleasantly surprised by the experience; a flicker of pain as the needles made contact, a dull pressure as the acupuncturist tapped the needles in position and then the sensations fading to a feeling of relaxation. A year later, I suffered a major injury to my right thigh, which showed no signs of improvement after nearly six months of medical and massage treatments. I turned to acupuncture and after only two-and-a-half months, was back to the point of running one of my fastest half marathons. My thigh injury has never recurred, and acupuncture has become a regular part of my training regimen.

 

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Acupuncture Helps GI Symptons

 

Live Well New York

 

The growing practice of integrative medicine, which uses conventional medical practices and Eastern healing approaches, is opening new doors for people with digestive diseases. It’s been shown to help manage everything from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and constipation to more chronic conditions like Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

 

At Beth Israel Medical Center Department of Integrative Medicine, a part of Continuum Hospitals of New York, the ancient Chinese therapy of acupuncture is one of several integrative treatments available to combat common gastrointestinal problems. “Acupuncture treats common GI conditions, and can be an essential part of healing along with dietary changes, probiotics, herbal medicine and conventional medicine,” says Arya Nielsen, PhD, Director of the Acupuncture Fellowship Program.

 

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Needle This: Study Hints at How Acupuncture Works to Relieve Stress

 

Time Magazine, March 15, 2013

 

Needles may not seem like the best tool for treating stress, but acupuncture could be tapping into basic biological systems that keep stress under control.Reporting in the Journal of Endocrinology, researchers led by Ladan Eshkevari, assistant program director of the nurse anesthesia program at Georgetown University School of Nursing and Health Studies, mimicked chronic stress in a rat model and documented how stimulating certain body points with acupuncture can alter stress hormones.

 

 The body’s stress response is triggered by two main pathways, one of which involves the HPA axis, or hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis, in which these areas of the brain are activated to release peptides and proteins such as corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). They, in turn, launch the production of other hormones such as cortisol and norepinephrine that rev up the anxiety meter. Once activated, the system causes the heart to beat faster and the senses to go on alert. It also diverts the body’s energy away from background operations such as digestion to prime and fuel the muscles into a state of readiness.

 

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Acupuncture Provides True Pain Relief in Study

 

NY Times, September 11, 2012

 

Needles may not seem like the best tool for treating stress, but acupuncture could be tapping into basic biological systems that keep stress under control.Reporting in the Journal of Endocrinology, researchers led by Ladan Eshkevari, assistant program director of the nurse anesthesia program at Georgetown University School of Nursing and Health Studies, mimicked chronic stress in a rat model and documented how stimulating certain body points with acupuncture can alter stress hormones.

 

Continued here